Live exports: 2,500 bulls destined for Libya

A consignment of approximately 2,500 bulls (consisting of Limousin, Charolais and Friesian breeding) set sail for Libya last week. The animals were planned to be exported two weeks ago, however harsh weather conditions halted the shipment.

A consignment of approximately 2,500 bulls (consisting of Limousin, Charolais and Friesian breeding) set sail for Libya last week. The animals were planned to be exported two weeks ago, however harsh weather conditions halted the shipment.

According to Bord Bia, a total of 11,507 head of cattle have been exported to Libya thus far in 2020. This figure has seen an increase of 4,898 head on the previous year.
This shipment has been organised by Curzon Livestock. The contract was said to be filled with commercial Limousin and Charolais bulls with weights of 400-600kg and also consisted of Friesian bulls weighing from 200kg to 400kg.

Live Exports This Year
This year a total of 240,527 cattle have been exported, according to Bord Bia. This figure has seen a decrease of 32,722 head of cattle exported in comparison to last year’s figures.

Northern Ireland continues to be our largest live export market increase this year, having previously experienced major declines during the year of 2018. An additional 25,930 head of cattle have been exported to the north this year.

The major declines in exports continues to be involving countries such as the Netherlands, which has suffered a 34,584 head deficit, and Spain, which has experienced a 10.2% decrease in exports.

These countries would be the Republic of Ireland’s leading dairy-bred calf importers, and the declines can be attributed to the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic halting trade.

Exports to Italy have also had a reduction of 8,661 head of cattle this year.

Taking a look at the age categories of cattle exported, finished cattle are proving to be the most popular segment to be exported this year, with an additional 16,485 head of finished cattle being traded. This segment of cattle exports would be aided by the boost in Northern Ireland exports as animals can be sent for direct slaughter.

Calves, on the other hand, have seen a 53,783 head deficit in exports so far for 2020. This can be associated with the decline in markets such as Holland and Spain, as previously mentioned.